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  • ISSN: 2333-6668
    Current Issue
    Volume 5, Issue 3
    Review Article
    Salicylic Acid Induced Salt Stress Tolerance in Plants
    Salicylic acid (SA) is a phenolic phytohormone acting as signaling molecule and tolerance against abiotic stresses. It plays a vital role within the plant response to adverse environmental conditions similar to salinity. Soil salinity is a major problem of food production because it limits crop yield and restricts use of land previously uncultivated. It plays vital role in plant growth, ion uptake and transport, preventing oxidative damage in plant by detoxifying super oxide radicals, produced as a result of salinity. This review provides the evidence that supports the role of SA during plant growth and development is reviewed by comparing various experiments performed by application of SA under salt stress conditions.
    Rajeshwari V and Bhuvaneshwari V*
    Salicylic acid (SA) is a phenolic phytohormone acting as signaling molecule and tolerance against abiotic stresses. It plays a vital role within the plant response to adverse environmental conditions similar to salinity. Soil salinity is a major problem of food production because it limits crop yield and restricts use of land previously uncultivated. It plays vital role in plant growth, ion uptake and transport, preventing oxidative damage in plant by detoxifying super oxide radicals, produced as a result of salinity. This review provides the evidence that supports the role of SA during plant growth and development is reviewed by comparing various experiments performed by application of SA under salt stress conditions.
    Short Comunication
    Ayan Raichaudhuri*
    ABC transporters are membrane bound proteins involved in the transport of a broad range of amphipathic molecules across membranes. The superfamily of ABC transporters contain highly represented subfamilies and MRPs (ABCCs) are one of them. Plant MRPs like Arabidopsis thaliana MRP1 also transport various glutathione conjugates and heavy metals like arsenic across membranes and is already known to be involved in vacuolar transport of folates. In presence of increasing amount of arsenite (AsIII) salt the plants show less root and shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana MRP1 T-DNA homozygous mutants compared to wild type plants. Results showed that wild type AtMRP1 is tolerant against arsenite stress because of AtMRP1 function and earlier results showed MRP1 phosphorylation is a potential regulator in this tolerance. Here phospho-serine antibody cross reacted with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type plant leaf extracts only in absence of arsenite which indicates the change in protein phosphorylation and expression in presence of arsenite. To understand the effects of arsenite on AtMRP1 wild type and mutant plant growth experiments were done. The experiments provided an important insight on AtMRP1 plants under arsenite stress conditions.
    Research Article
    Janete Oliveira S. Valim, Natalia C. Teixeira, Maria Goreti A. Oliveira, and Wellington G. Campos*
    The presence of glucosinolates (GLS) in Brassicaceaeis thought to be the first line of plant defense against a variety of insects and pathogens. Influence of drought stress on constitutive GLS has been documented; however, its effect on herbivory-induced GLS is poorly known, especially with respect to different feeding guilds of insects. Collard (Brassica oleracea L. cv. acephala) plants were grown in well-watered, slightly water-stressed and severely water-stressed conditions. Then, the plants were subjected to infestations by two host-specific herbivores, the leaf-chewing Plutellaxylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) or the phloem-feeding Brevicorynebrassicae L. (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Concentration of total leaf GLS decreased in severely drought-stressed plants; however, in no water regime collards had their total GLS increased due to damage by both specialist insects. Thus, we did not found evidence for total GLS induction by insect damage, irrespective of insect feeding guild or level of plant water-stress. Naturally occurring droughts or deliberate submission of collard crops to water limitation may not affect herbivore-induced GLS, but constitutive resistance against insect attack may be reduced.
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