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  • ISSN: 2373-9819
    Early Online
    Volume 6, Issue 2
    Case Report
    Nemalidinne Keerthi*, Mohan Kumar K, Raghupathi, Prakash M, and Sreeramulu PN
    Breast tuberculosis is a rare manifestation of extra-pulmonary localization of the disease which accounts for less than 0.1% of breast conditions in developed countries, but reaches 3-4% in regions where the disease presents with high incidence. It appears mostly in women of reproductive age. We report a 34 year old lady with right breast lump and axillary lymphadenopathy. Smear for tuberculosis and TB tissue cultures were positive and the histopathology repeatedly showed granulomatous inflammation. Treatment with surgery followed by standard anti tubercular drugs was started once mycobacterium tuberculosis was finally cultured from the excised tissue. This case highlights the difficulty in differentiating culture negative tuberculosis from other causes of chronic granulomatous mastitis and the importance of keeping a high index of clinical suspicion.
    Venkat Reddy Kallem*
    Orofacial clefts are the most common craniofacial malformations and include Cleft Lip with or without associated Cleft Palate [CL/P] or isolated Cleft Palate. Failure of fusion of median nasal process with maxillary processes and fusion of lateral palatal shelves results in cleft lip and cleft palate respectively. Optimal management of CL/P includes multidisciplinary team comprising of Paediatrician, Plastic Surgeon, Otorhinolaryngologist, Maxillofacial Surgeon, Orthodontist, Speech Therapist, Geneticist, Psychologist and Public Health Nurse. Closure of the lip is usually done around 10-12 weeks of life and cleft palate is repaired before 12 months of age. Various techniques of closure are followed based on the type of the defect. Velopharyngeal insufficiency after cleft palate repair is common and these children should be under follow up and require speech evaluation and speech therapy to have optimum function.
    Constantine Kanakis*, Mohamed S. Aziz, and Stanley J. Oiseth
    Primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) is a rare entity. PPL cases of T-cell origin represent a small, even less frequent subset. Only 19 such cases of T-cell PPL have been reported in literature, with none having a history of prior radiation or chemotherapy. Reported here, is a case of primary pulmonary peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) in a 63-year-old woman with a significant history of breast carcinoma six years prior, treated by wide local excision followed by standard adjunctive chemotherapy and radiation. Despite such rarity, PPL/PTCL should be included in the differential of pulmonary nodules, regardless of the clinical scenario or pretest probabilities. This case highlights the problems in diagnosing this entity, the historical epidemiologic relationship between breast cancer and lymphoma. It also highlights a distinct opportunity to examine errors in medical diagnoses and potential inclusions in future differential diagnoses algorithms.
    Thomas Busch* and Aziz Mohamad
    Amyloidoma is a rare presentation of tissue amyloid deposition usually seen in the respiratory, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts, but has also been reported in the mediastinum, central nervous system, skin, breast, and soft tissue. In this case, a 55-year-old man presented with a 5-cm soft tissue mass in the gluteal region, suggestive of a lipoma. Eventually the mass was found to be an isolated amyloidoma associated with a localized plasmacytoma. Soft-tissue amyloidoma in the absence of systemic amyloidosis or plasma cell dyscrasia in bone marrow is uncommon, and those localized to the extremities are extremely rare.
    Carolina Fonseca*, Lawrence Brookman, Mohamad Aziz, Alicia Heidenreich, and Mario Dervish
    Myoepithelial carcinomas are rare. To the best of our knowledge, this case report accounts for the third report in the English literature of this malignant tumor occurring in the foot. This case is also unique in that the patient was a ten-year-old child who presented with metastasis to inguinal lymph node. This case highlights the importance of keeping myoepithelial carcinoma in the differential list when diagnosing soft tissue tumors.
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