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  • ISSN: 2379-9501
    Volume 4 Issue 1
    Research Article
    Genuine Reyes* and Alita Conde
    Aims: This research specifically determined the perceived degree of career commitment among staff nurses, the level of their academic motivation, and the significant association of career commitment and motivation to pursue postgraduate education amongst them.
    Methods: This research utilized a quantitative and predictive approach. A total of 97 staff nurses with at least two years work experience in government tertiary hospital in the Philippine were selected through purposive sampling. Prior to the study, ERB/IRB approval was sought and informs consent was provided. The respondents were then asked to answer the Career Commitment Measurement and Academic Motivation Scale questionnaires that were pretested with a cronbach alpha of 0.83 and 0.93 Statistical analysis was carried out using Stata 12. Associations were assessed using simple regression analysis. P values less than or equal to 0.05 was considered statistically significant.
    Results: The results showed a significant association between career commitment and intrinsic motivation (p-value=0.000). However, career commitment and extrinsic motivation (p-value=0.131) did not display a significant relationship.
    Conclusions: The results displayed that staff nurses with high level of career commitment and intrinsic motivation will more likely pursue postgraduate education. Therefore it is imperative to encourage and support nurses to maintain their career commitment in a high level, to keep them motivated to grow and to learn.
    Genuine Reyes* and Alita Conde
    Aims: This research specifically determined the perceived extent of career growth opportunities by the staff nurses inside the organization, their level of motivation to pursue postgraduate education, and the association of career growth opportunities and motivation to pursue postgraduate education among them.
    Methods: A quantitative, predictive design was utilized through a purposive sampling of 97 staff nurses with 2 years work experience in government tertiary hospital in the Philippines. After ERB/IRB approval and inform consent, the respondents answered the Career Growth Scale and Academic Motivation Scale questionnaires that were pretested with a cronbach alpha of 0.94 and 0.93. Stata 12 was used to analyze the data, and multiple regression analysis to assess the association of the variables. P values less than or equal to 0.05 was considered statistically significant.
    Results: The results revealed a significant association between career growth opportunities and extrinsic motivation (p-value=0.000). However career growth opportunities and intrinsic motivation (p-value=0.055) did not display a significant relationship.
    Conclusions: Overall, the results showed when the nurses perceive satisfactory career growth opportunities from their organization, there is a tendency that they will be and extrinsically motivated to pursue postgraduate education.
    Mellisa A. Hall*, Roberta E. Hoebeke, and Angela K. Wooton
    Evaluating nurse practitioner students’ clinical performance is a vital and challenging role of nursing faculty. Identifying gaps in student knowledge and providing individualized feedback will enhance future clinical performance. Two methods of student evaluation were compared: preceptor clinical evaluation scores and open book exam scores. The two groups of evaluators scored student performance in an initial graduate clinical course, and the scores between evaluators were compared for the same first year course over a four year period (n= 242). For three of the four years, there was weak correlation between faculty scoring open book exams and preceptors scoring student clinical performance. One year (2015) showed a significant correlation between the two evaluation methods. The two evaluation methods provide richer data for student assessment than either method alone. Additional investigation of this potential theory/praxis gap is warranted.
    Estelle Codier*
    There is sample empirical evidence that emotional intelligence (EI) abilities correlate with performance, retention and burn out prevention in both the general population and among health care providers. Although EI is a relatively new concept that has emerged over the past 20 years, hundreds of workforce research studies have provided evidence of its importance. Because of the importance of understanding emotional intelligence within a diverse nursing workforce, and concomitantly the importance of nurses’ emotional intelligence ability, this study was undertaken to explore the relationship between ethnicity and emotional intelligence in nurses. The study was a quantitative, descriptive, retrospective secondary analysis of 5 studies carried out in Hawaii. All involved practicing nurses and nursing students. No significant differences were identified among the mean total EI score among the seven ethnic groups studied. When Caucasian participants were compared as a group with the remaining participants as a group, the understanding emotions, managing emotions, and strategic use of emotions sub-scores were significantly higher among the Caucasian participants. When Asians were compared with all other study participants as a group, the Asian participants’ strategic EI scores were significantly lower. Lastly, when Caucasians as a group and Asians as a group were compared, the following Caucasian participants’ scores were significantly higher: branch scores understanding emotions and managing emotions; area scores: strategic use of emotions. Findings from this study demonstrated clear sub score variation between ethnic groups included in this study. This variation could be explained by the widely reported concern for cultural bias in standardized testing, or could also be a reflection of variation in the perception and performance of emotional intelligence abilities among cultural groups.
    Review Article
    Marguerite M. Engler*
    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease which increases with aging. Dietary and lifestyle interventions have been recommended to optimize blood pressure levels. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), have an important role in cardiovascular health and disease. Convincing experimental and clinical evidence suggests that EPA and DHA provide vascular protection by improving endothelial function and lowering blood pressure. Potential mechanisms for these effects include fatty acid uptake and incorporation into endothelial cell membranes which modulate multiple important cell functions. The present review also addresses the vascular physiology, endothelial function and pathophysiology of hypertension, the potential mechanisms and metabolism of omega-3 fatty acids. In addition, guidelines for dietary Intake of omega-3 fatty acids and measurement of omega-3 fatty acid intake are presented.
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